Afrofuturism and the Black Panther?

Before the release of Ryan Coogler’s superhero blockbuster Black Panther, I discovered social media buzz about Afrofuturism. The term immediately brought to mind images of pyramids and spaceships with AFROFUTURISM written in pink neon graffiti across the starry night sky. I was close.

Through cursory research, I found Afrofuturism to be a movement centered on the intersection of art, science, and technology. The term was coined by the author and cultural critic Mark Dery in his 1994 essay “Black to the Future,” which examines science or speculative fiction within the African diaspora. Jamie Broadnax, editor-in-chief and creator of the online community Black Girl Nerds, takes the definition a bit further, adding that Afrofuturism is different from standard science fiction because it’s steeped in ancient African traditions and black identity. “A narrative that simply features a black character in a futuristic world is not enough. To be Afrofuturism, it must be rooted in and unapologetically celebrate the uniqueness and innovation of black culture.”

Janelle Monae With that, I realized I had totally seen Afrofuturistic elements in the music and art of Outkast and Janelle Monáe, and in the science fiction of Octavia Butler. I took these as one-offs, however; it didn’t register as a conscious movement.

Now I see the Black Panther in a different light, as a great step forward in not only Afrofuturism, but in superhero storytelling. The film has already exceeded box office expectations and continues to pull in crowds with its  critical praise and positive word of mouth, even with the highly anticipated Avengers: Infinity War coming in less than three months.

I went with to a matinee with my wife and siblings-in-law at the Grand Lake Theater the day after Black Panther opened.  Because Coogler is from Oakland, directed Fruitvale Station, and includes Oakland-based locations and characters in the film, Grand Lake was the obvious choice.  Apparently, everyone else thought so too! Lines stretched down Grand and Walker avenues, taking anywhere from 45 minutes upward before moving. An extra draw to the theater that day may have been due to Coogler’s surprise appearance the night before. According to social media reports, he dropped several Easter eggs about Bay Area representation in the film.


Photo taken by my wife of the Grand Lake Theater in Oakland before the matinee.

We didn’t see any cosplayers or anyone with Afrofuturistic style at our showing, but a good number of people wore African and African-Inspired clothing, especially for the evening showing—ladies donned jewelry, colorful head wraps, and regal gowns, while men wore tunics with fancifully embroidered collars.


Inside, the diverse crowd buzzed as people searched for seats and stood in concession lines. Once the house lights dimmed and the red velvet curtain rose, the crowd hushed as previews began. The only previews that stood out were both science fiction entries—A Wrinkle in Time, which appears to have Afrofuturistic elements, and Solo: A Star Wars Story, which…I actually don’t know what to make about Solo just yet. The film seems way undermarketed, which is not a good sign for a movie, especially for a brand as huge as Star Wars; plus, the trailer left me with more questions than excitement. At least Chewbacca is in it!

a-wrinkle-in-time-poster-slice-600x200At any rate, the Afrofuturistic elements and strong female leads in A Wrinkle in Time and Black Panther made me think of how diversity and gender equality are having moments even in this socially and politically divisive time. Further, with the successes of Jordan Peele’s social thriller Get Out, Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman (2017), and the evermore-diverse Star Wars films of late, moviemakers should realize the time has died for appeasing only one type of audience for box office success. Video game developers have known this for a while with the advent of create-a-character games, which allow players to gallivant as versions of themselves around virtual worlds.

The success of Black Panther creates a new template for Marvel’s movies, much like the first Iron Man did back in ‘08, Gamespot’s Tamoor Hussain notes. One reason is because T’Challa is already a hero who fights for and with his people, as opposed to a goodhearted, yet selfish person who gains superhero status after forced maturation, such as with characters like Tony Stark, Thor, and Dr. Strange. Hussain also adds that the Black Panther is doing so well at the box office because the film has its own identity, akin to how Thor: Ragnarok felt so different from the usual Marvel superhero movie.

And the above-mentioned difference is partially why I haven’t written a formal review for the film—there is so much to unpack. I mean that in a good way. The movie offers so many avenues for discussion that I want to see it again to both enjoy and analyze.

Related topics buzzing in my mind at the moment are:

  • Black Panther’s role in the Marvel Universe as a superhero and as a king;
  • The fabulous Dora Milaje (the all-female military that protects the king and Wakanda);
  • Colorism in film (Bollywood, I’m talking to you, too!);
  • Traditional Wakandans, the Jabari, who do not use Vibranium v. the other tribes who thrive mostly due to mining the wondrous metal;
  • Indigenous people in media
  • Un-colonized African nobility v. African diasporic hardships due to colonization as represented in Wakanda and Oakland (or T’Challa and Killmonger);
  • How traditions die or change over time and why
  • Black and Native nerds and techies;
  • Afrocentric and Indigenous beauty;
  • Why haters (as opposed to critics) hate;
  • Black Panther’s relationship with Storm of the X-Men (we need a crossover!);
  • Black Panther, Bucky Barnes, and Captain America;
  • Why characters of African descent don’t need to have “Black” in their names;
  • *SPOILERS * Wakanda’s place in the world now that it has been outed—my guess is that the world will need its tech to battle the infamous Thanos!;
  • The Black Panther comics given to me as Christmas gifts; and
  • The Black Panther pajama pant given to me as a random gift!

I’ll definitely make separate posts on some of the above topics, depending on how deep the rabbit holes go. For now, I’ll say that the film can be enjoyed at every level of engagement from popcorn flick fodder, to movie club discussion topic, to hardcore academic analysis.

0218_WI_APAFRO_02_sq.0One of my criticisms with the film going in was regarding CGI usage. The trailers didn’t impress me in that regard. In general, I’m against CGI because it rarely adds whatever artistic weight filmmakers intend. Said plainly, most CGI looks fake. Thankfully, many of Black Panther’s sets and characters are grounded in the physical world, leaving room for only a few flat digital effects. What remains is pretty good. The African utopia brought to life, with its elevated Vibranium-powered bullet trains, humming around high-rise buildings and through bustling markets is a sight.

A huge film highlight is the Dora Milaje. Not only is the force based in historical reality, but its representation of women’s natural beauty, intelligence, and strength is amazing. Additionally, The Wakandan answer to James Bond’s Q, Letitia Wright as Shuri, is so vibrant and believable as T’Challa’s genius little sister. Said to be the smartest person in the Marvel Universe (yes, smarter than Tony Stark and Bruce Banner), she is the mastermind behind:

  • the remote vehicle operation technology;
  • Black Panther’s updated Vibranium suit that fits inside of a necklace and can store and release kinetic energy as a pulse wave;
  • the Wakandan stealth ship;
  • sneakers; and
  • most other Wakandan gadgets and upgrades.

Much like Afropunk, Afrofuturism seems like it’s always been a thing, but the requirement mentioned above, the unapologetic celebration of the uniqueness and technological innovation of Black culture, is hard to come by in mainstream pop culture. Even those who don’t identify as Black or of African descent can see, at least for this moment, the great amount of celebration and pride the movie has inspired.

Wakanda forever, yes, but Afrofuturism, too. I think it’s cool.

This entry was published on February 27, 2018 at 5:27 am. It’s filed under african, african-american, Ancestry / Heritage, black, Culture, film, indigenous, Observation, Review and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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